Tuesday, October 11, 2005

News from Somalia

Two activists for the CPD, a Somali Non-Governmental Organisation that campaigns for peace and democracy are in Madina hospital in Mogadishu, in urgent need of being moved to an advanced medical facility for surgery for gunshot wounds.

Mohamed Abdi Halim and Adan Osman Mohamed were shot by unknown gunmen on October 1st 2005 as they left the office of the Center for Peace and Democracy (CPD) in Mogadishu. The vice chair of the CPD was also shot, but is receiving attention at a hospital in Dubai.

Ali Said Omar Ibrahim, the chair of the CPD, writes:

To brief you about my friends injuries situation. Thank God they are both conscious and mindful. The most serious case is that of Mohamed Abdi Halim. We have fear he might lose both or one of his legs if he does not receive emergency advanced surgery immediately. He has been in Madina hospital for 10 days without the necessary medical treatments needed. He is 32 years old. The shot hit both of his legs. His left leg received probably two bullets and is badly injured. His right leg also received a number of shots and is badly broken in the shinbone just near and above the ankle. The bullets exploded on impact upon with the shinbone. This leg is badly broken and as doctors suggested will need extra bones to fill the holes. The doctors here have just covered his legs with bandage and gave him some antibiotic injections. This a brief about Mohamed Abdi Halim.

On the other hand, Adan Osman Mohamed is 38 years old. He has been shot at the right lower back and the bullet is still lodged. The bullet is probably lodged near his kidneys.



The CPD campaigns for empowerment of civil society organisations to end the fifteen years of factional fighting and absence of civil government. Its aims and methods are entirely non-violent. Here is their website

It is in everyone's interests to restore peace and democracy to Somalia. If gunmen are able to intimidate and assault non-violent civil society campaigners with impunity, the rule of law throughout the world is weakened. If their victims are given the best care possible, it signals to the gunmen and the international community that the world values the work of civil society volunteers.

I have spoken to the Foreign Office in London, who have given me contacts with the UK High Comissioner in Nairobi; I have just spoken to Nick Pyle, who works for the UK foreign office in Nairobi, but he says that there is no chance of diverting resources to non-UK passport holders. He will speak tomorrow ot ?Asher al-Elmi, a Somali MP, but she is about to take time out in Harvard, USA - sounds as if she is losing heart. I have also spoken to my MP who promised help if getting visas is a problem.

This is not a great deal of help, I am sorry to say, but I will keep trying. I have yet to phone through to the BMA (British Medical Association), Medecins sans Frontieres, and Amnesty International, but I am not hopeful that they can do anything.

Somalia is awash with guns and ammunition. Would that arms and ammunition manufacturers were compelled to carry insurance to pay for adverse effects of their products...

3 comments:

Roberto Iza Valdes said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Roberto Iza Valdes said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Roberto Iza Valdes said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.